Motorists not yet convinced of driverless benefits, suggests survey

Many drivers do not see the promised benefits of automated and driverless vehicles, according to a new survey, which found that more than a third of motorists could not identify any advantages from future advances in automotive technology.

The message from motorists is clear – talk less about ‘tomorrow’s world’ and more about real world benefits.
— Mark Griffiths, Continental Tyres

The survey by Continental Tyres questioned 2,000 motorists about driverless cars. It found that more than a third of respondents believe people are becoming too lazy and reliant on technology (37%) and that a similar proportion see too many risks associated with technology, such as being hacked (36%).

Indeed, according to the poll, motorists are three times as likely to be scared of autonomous vehicles (44%), due to the loss of personal control, than they are likely to see the positive opportunities.



“Drivers have to contend with immediate real world issues like congestion, the cost of motoring and environmental impact, and in some instances technologies being developed now are not being identified as a solution for those issues – yet they absolutely are,” said Mark Griffiths, safety expert at Continental Tyres.

“Future advances will transform motoring and technology businesses like ours need to explain how present challenges will be reduced or eliminated – like congestion, costs and environmental impact.

“The message from motorists is clear – talk less about ‘tomorrow’s world’ and more about real world benefits.”